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PETER LINDBERGH  / A FRIEND

PETER LINDBERGH / A FRIEND


RISK-TAKER + WING WALKER

SUPERNOVA AKA NATALIA VODIANOVA /  THE FRONT ROW REVOLUZZE R / NAKED HEART

SUPERNOVA AKA NATALIA VODIANOVA / THE FRONT ROW REVOLUZZER / NAKED HEART

THE COMEBACK  / THE CHEF WHO ERASED THE STARS AND STARTED A COMEBACK IN AN OLD SKATER HANGER

THE COMEBACK / THE CHEF WHO ERASED THE STARS AND STARTED A COMEBACK IN AN OLD SKATER HANGER

LE MONTANA  / PARIS / WHERE MODELS + CREATIVES CONGREGATE

LE MONTANA / PARIS / WHERE MODELS + CREATIVES CONGREGATE

THE ART BUNKER

THE ART BUNKER

JACK Z. THE ISLAND PARFUM

JACK Z. THE ISLAND PARFUM

HOLLYWOOD’S WHO IS WHO 2020

HOLLYWOOD’S WHO IS WHO 2020

MAYA DE ST.BARTH / LA CHEF

MAYA DE ST.BARTH / LA CHEF

THE OSCAR I I. ISLAND AWARD 2020

THE OSCAR II. ISLAND AWARD 2020

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ACE ENCOUNTERS

ACE ENCOUNTERS



ACE ENCOUNTERS

M.PRADA  : THE ONE-WOMAN-SHOW

M.PRADA : THE ONE-WOMAN-SHOW

Demna Gvasalia: the activist at Balenciaga  The designer arrived at the Kering-owned house with a plan to “shake the box”. Three years later, it’s one of the hottest labels in the world. He talks controversy, his connection to Cristóbal and why jeans can still be couture.

Demna Gvasalia: the activist at Balenciaga

The designer arrived at the Kering-owned house with a plan to “shake the box”. Three years later, it’s one of the hottest labels in the world. He talks controversy, his connection to Cristóbal and why jeans can still be couture.


EMILY RATAJOWSKI /  THE RUNWAY REBEL

EMILY RATAJOWSKI / THE RUNWAY REBEL


THE ART BUNKER

THE ART SCENE

THE ART SCENE

NEW ART MUSEUM NYC /  INSIDE

NEW ART MUSEUM NYC / INSIDE


THE POOLMAN  / HOCKNEY’S MILLION DOLLAR HIT

THE POOLMAN / HOCKNEY’S MILLION DOLLAR HIT

DAVID HOCKNEY /  THE POOLMAN

DAVID HOCKNEY / THE POOLMAN

ART BUNKER / LIBESKIND DESIGN / BARBARA WEILL

ART BUNKER / LIBESKIND DESIGN / BARBARA WEILL

REBELS + WING WALKER


500 SPIAGGINA ‘58 CAPRI

500 SPIAGGINA ‘58 CAPRI

THE MASTERPIECE / LOW DRAG JAGUAR E-TYPE

THE MASTERPIECE / LOW DRAG JAGUAR E-TYPE

THE TAIWANA BEACH HOUSE CLUB / ST. BARTH

THE TAIWANA BEACH HOUSE CLUB / ST. BARTH

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UNDER-THE-RADAR


LUCIE WEILL /  THE PERFECT SHELTER

LUCIE WEILL / THE PERFECT SHELTER

GREAT TALKS / THE NEXT COMMUNICATION

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THE MISSION

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The 100 World aims to build a global community of friends and fellow travelers who seek made-to-measure experiences, meaningful connections and goods with stories to tell. A community of makers and dreamers, we commit to helping each other, and the planet we share, to thrive.

Cathédrale  The new Moxy East Village is making major waves, not least of all because of its seriously stunning in-house restaurant, Cathédrale. Helmed by Executive Chef Jason Hall, the French-Mediterranean spot serves up ingredient-driven dishes beneath a 19-foot wire mesh sculpture by internationally-celebrated Italian artist Edoardo Tresoldi, which transforms the triple-high ceilings of the main dining room into a domed masterpiece. Praise be.

Cathédrale

The new Moxy East Village is making major waves, not least of all because of its seriously stunning in-house restaurant, Cathédrale. Helmed by Executive Chef Jason Hall, the French-Mediterranean spot serves up ingredient-driven dishes beneath a 19-foot wire mesh sculpture by internationally-celebrated Italian artist Edoardo Tresoldi, which transforms the triple-high ceilings of the main dining room into a domed masterpiece. Praise be.

Veteran chef John DeLucie has teamed up with fellow restaurateurs AJ Bontempo and Sergio and Mario Riva to debut Ainslie, a massive Italian wine bar, eatery, and beer garden in Williamsburg. The multi-level space is sure to become a one-stop fave; you can dine on wood-fired pizza and housemade pasta, lounge with wine on the mezzanine, then finish your night in the outdoor beer garden or at the roof deck bar. We love options!   Ainslie , 76 Ainslie St., Brooklyn

Veteran chef John DeLucie has teamed up with fellow restaurateurs AJ Bontempo and Sergio and Mario Riva to debut Ainslie, a massive Italian wine bar, eatery, and beer garden in Williamsburg. The multi-level space is sure to become a one-stop fave; you can dine on wood-fired pizza and housemade pasta, lounge with wine on the mezzanine, then finish your night in the outdoor beer garden or at the roof deck bar. We love options!

Ainslie, 76 Ainslie St., Brooklyn

Portale 

After 34 years, a Michelin star, and a few James Beard Awards, chef Alfred Portale has left the kitchen at Gotham Bar & Grill in order to open his solo venture, Portale. The contemporary Italian venue will aim for a more fun and relaxed vibe and will boast an in-house milling program to create its own flour for house-made bread, polenta and pasta.

Portale, 126 West 18th St.

Soho's upcoming Greek eatery, Lola Taverna, seems slated to become quite the trendy hot spot (all the cool kids are going Greek these days). The brainchild of restaurateur Cobi Levy (Little Prince, Babu Ji and Black Seed Bagels), Thanasis Panourgias (Nammos, Yves), and Will Makris (Socialista, Broken Coconut), the spot will highlight laid-back Greek island fare in a minimalist, ceramic-filled space. Bonus points for outdoor seating and three floor-to-ceiling windows. 

Lola Taverna, 210 6th Ave.

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The mastermind behind world-renowned restaurant Manu, in Brazil, is landing in New York City, and just about every foodie is excited about it. Chef Manoella Buffara is set to unveil her upscale Brazilian spot in Chelsea this November, which will focus on sustainability and locally-sourced and organic ingredients in plates made to be shared.

Ella, 436 W 15th St.

[Photo via @manubuffara]

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Chinese-American culture stands to be at the forefront of Chef Simone Tong’s upcoming West Village locale, Silver Apricot, where the Little Tong owner plans to explore identity through food (which here will include housemade cheeses, charcuterie and breads). The higher-end concept will also allow Tong to get creative and curatorial with a chef’s counter and tasting menu.  Silver Apricot, 20 Cornelia St.   [Photo via @   sisitongtong   ]

Chinese-American culture stands to be at the forefront of Chef Simone Tong’s upcoming West Village locale, Silver Apricot, where the Little Tong owner plans to explore identity through food (which here will include housemade cheeses, charcuterie and breads). The higher-end concept will also allow Tong to get creative and curatorial with a chef’s counter and tasting menu.

Silver Apricot, 20 Cornelia St.

[Photo via @sisitongtong]

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Aspen’s Veuve Clicquot pop-up on the slopes. A secret roaming champagne and caviar.

Aspen’s Veuve Clicquot pop-up on the slopes. A secret roaming champagne and caviar.

THE RED ROOM / MARK‘S PRIVATE CLUB MAYFAIR

THE RED ROOM / MARK‘S PRIVATE CLUB MAYFAIR

THE RED ROOM / MARK‘S CLUB LONDON

Mark’s Club carries emotional resonance for its members. For many of those returning, there may be a fear that Superman’s cape has received a tug or the Lone Ranger’s mask has been pulled off. But most will be pleasantly surprised.

Mark’s Club owner Richard Caring     Mark’s Club carries emotional resonance for its members. For many of those returning, there may be a fear that Superman’s cape has received a tug or the Lone Ranger’s mask has been pulled off. But most will be pleasantly surprised.  Designer Rifat Ozbek at Loulou’s, to which he has just finished adding new interiors elements | Image: Neale Haynes/Contour by Getty Images  “There were several ‘non-negotiables’ for the club,” explains Caring, “such as keeping the porter’s box in reception and the iconic William Morris wallpaper that graces the reception and travels all the way up to the top floor.” Birley’s comforting, magpie-like visual sensibilities are still evident: shot-silk pleated walls, paisley carpets and Moroccan side tables. Regulars will be delighted that the red dining room is still clad in red Fortuny fabric, and that the moody, gigantic 1920s oil painting  In Time of Peace ,by Scottish artist Robert Gemmell Hutchison, of scarlet-coated military men in rows of pews, is still upstairs, adjacent to a grand new humidor.  The Deli-Bar at 12 Hay Hill, which opened in September | Image: Andy Sheppard  “The club had become something of a wilted flower,” says Zervudachi. “We ordered rich coloured silks and weaves for new upholstery and created a recessed coloured-glass light box in the ceiling of the rear dining room.” Dubens called on Zervudachi after the designer had created interiors for his private homes, and he sees the club as an extension of its members’ houses. “Mark Birley’s original idea was that this was going to be a beautiful place for people to enjoy during the week, and then at the weekend they went to their country homes,” says Dubens. “His level of detail was amazing. But there wasn’t a single comfortable chair here before. I flew to Paris with Tino when he was working with the upholsterers and sat in every single chair before it came to the club. Now everything is elegant  and  comfortable.”  12 Hay Hill’s co-founder and designer Anton Khmelnitskiy  There have been many changes at Mark’s, including the addition of a third-floor private dining room, but the club is not chasing trends. “The club feels fresh, while still being quintessentially ‘Birley’,” says Caring. A cappuccino comes in a Limoges cup and saucer with a magenta floral pattern on it; a Warhol sketch of a pink angel hangs against pink and blue Liberty wallpaper; the bar manager wears a bow tie, and his staff immaculate off-white blazers designed by textile specialists Scabal. From a theatrical Linley backgammon table to the collection of Salon champagnes and the Empire-style bronze chandelier above the bar, Mark’s Club is a modern classic – a place to go for a homemade pizza in the bar upstairs as much as the formal dining it was previously associated with.    A few streets from Mark’s, Rifat Ozbek has just finished adding new elements to the interior of Loulou’s, Robin Birley’s club-within-a-club at 5 Hertford Street (membership price on request). Ozbek – one of the most celebrated fashion designers of the 1980s and who now creates a Turkish-style cushion range under the label Yastık – has been dressing Birley’s wife Lucy for decades, hence the connection. “The original brief was to do something ‘timeless’,” says Ozbek. “After four years, it’s getting better every day.” More recently, to give the basement area a better flow, Ozbek has created what he calls “a love tunnel” in silk damask paisley patterns, from the dance floor to the lobby. He also opened up the Venetian, Bakst and Ottoman-themed dining rooms “with mirrored gothic Moorish arches – so you can now see the changing colours of every room from one place”. Along with the brief of “timeless”, Ozbek was told there was “no budget, no limits; more is more” by Birley. The result might be the most opulent club in London, even more so than before.    “Working with Rifat is immensely exciting,” says craftsman Rupert Bevan, who worked on the arches and is known for creating some of the most specialist mirrors, furniture and finishings in the UK. “The experience has been dazzling, bewildering and imaginative, unlike anything I’ve worked on before. The new project took the use of mirrors in interiors to a whole different level in terms of surface decoration and lighting. The arches use mirrored glass hand-painted in faux tortoiseshell that’s backlit with LEDs to shine pink. The effect is enchanting and compelling, drawing you into these mysterious little worlds within the club.”    London’s new clubs embrace the exotic as much as they ever did, even if some of them are now on grander scales than the likes of Mark Birley ever attempted. The interior of the Devonshire Club will incorporate elements that are a little bit Charles Rennie Mackintosh, a touch Piet Mondrian. There’ll be plenty of marble, along with midcentury furniture and carpets that look like a monochrome take on the flooring of the hallways in  The Shining . The tiling on the floors of the ensuite bathrooms is modernist Mediterranean – graphic with a restrained colour palette. “The rooms are going to be uncluttered,” says Clivaz. “Often you go to a  hotel  and there’s too much stuff. People want a good shower, a deep bath and a TV that you can watch from a very comfortable bed. In terms of furniture, we might be the most bespoke hotel and club ever.”  Practicality to one side, every club needs a touch of fantasy. As well as producing the Murano glass that Clivaz is looking forward to, Seguso used to create pieces for the arch-postmodernist Memphis group, with its inspiring colour juxtapositions. Meanwhile, interior designer David d’Almada of Sagrada hopes that his designs for the new bedrooms at Mayfair’s The Arts Club (rooms from £600 per night; membership £2,000 per annum, plus £2,000 joining fee) allow the guest “to come back 16 times and have 16 different experiences”. A club is part retreat, part stage. “You can feel like an explorer, wandering around the different areas of Loulou’s,” says Bevan, which was exactly Ozbek’s intention: “My fashion collections had a theme – native American, Ottoman or African – and I was able to adapt that idea for a nightclub,” he explains. “There’s a Tibetan dance floor, a belle-époque entrance hall and a Venetian room. I’ve mixed fabrics, so there are three styles in a chair, just as I used to do with my clothing.” One particularly pretty embellishment at the new-look Loulou’s is a small installation of gold-leaf branches with butterflies, created by model Stella Tennant and her sister Issy.  When d’Almada took on the original task of redesigning The Arts Club (which had strayed a little into Miss Havisham territory) for its reopening in 2011, he restored prosaic aspects of the building that had been hastily fixed up after it was bombed in the Blitz. “It was my way of saying to the members that I had respect for what the club was before,” he says. At the same time, he turned the glamour dial up to 11, bleaching the grand marble staircase and putting a chunky piano-finish handrail on it. It’s Mayfair, but also pure Hollywood.  Somewhere between those two locations lies the secret of the perfect private members’ club. Clivaz says he wants his new space to be “unashamedly glamorous”; Caring wants “to feel part of something where every element and last detail has been carefully considered to enhance and inform the experience”, while for Dubens, it’s a simple, certain frisson: “I remember coming to Mark’s Club at around 23, sitting at the bar drinking a whisky and thinking, ‘Wow – I’m really lucky to be in here.’” Wow factor is everything.

Mark’s Club owner Richard Caring

Mark’s Club carries emotional resonance for its members. For many of those returning, there may be a fear that Superman’s cape has received a tug or the Lone Ranger’s mask has been pulled off. But most will be pleasantly surprised.

Designer Rifat Ozbek at Loulou’s, to which he has just finished adding new interiors elements | Image: Neale Haynes/Contour by Getty Images

“There were several ‘non-negotiables’ for the club,” explains Caring, “such as keeping the porter’s box in reception and the iconic William Morris wallpaper that graces the reception and travels all the way up to the top floor.” Birley’s comforting, magpie-like visual sensibilities are still evident: shot-silk pleated walls, paisley carpets and Moroccan side tables. Regulars will be delighted that the red dining room is still clad in red Fortuny fabric, and that the moody, gigantic 1920s oil painting In Time of Peace,by Scottish artist Robert Gemmell Hutchison, of scarlet-coated military men in rows of pews, is still upstairs, adjacent to a grand new humidor.

The Deli-Bar at 12 Hay Hill, which opened in September | Image: Andy Sheppard

“The club had become something of a wilted flower,” says Zervudachi. “We ordered rich coloured silks and weaves for new upholstery and created a recessed coloured-glass light box in the ceiling of the rear dining room.” Dubens called on Zervudachi after the designer had created interiors for his private homes, and he sees the club as an extension of its members’ houses. “Mark Birley’s original idea was that this was going to be a beautiful place for people to enjoy during the week, and then at the weekend they went to their country homes,” says Dubens. “His level of detail was amazing. But there wasn’t a single comfortable chair here before. I flew to Paris with Tino when he was working with the upholsterers and sat in every single chair before it came to the club. Now everything is elegant and comfortable.”

12 Hay Hill’s co-founder and designer Anton Khmelnitskiy

There have been many changes at Mark’s, including the addition of a third-floor private dining room, but the club is not chasing trends. “The club feels fresh, while still being quintessentially ‘Birley’,” says Caring. A cappuccino comes in a Limoges cup and saucer with a magenta floral pattern on it; a Warhol sketch of a pink angel hangs against pink and blue Liberty wallpaper; the bar manager wears a bow tie, and his staff immaculate off-white blazers designed by textile specialists Scabal. From a theatrical Linley backgammon table to the collection of Salon champagnes and the Empire-style bronze chandelier above the bar, Mark’s Club is a modern classic – a place to go for a homemade pizza in the bar upstairs as much as the formal dining it was previously associated with.

A few streets from Mark’s, Rifat Ozbek has just finished adding new elements to the interior of Loulou’s, Robin Birley’s club-within-a-club at 5 Hertford Street (membership price on request). Ozbek – one of the most celebrated fashion designers of the 1980s and who now creates a Turkish-style cushion range under the label Yastık – has been dressing Birley’s wife Lucy for decades, hence the connection. “The original brief was to do something ‘timeless’,” says Ozbek. “After four years, it’s getting better every day.” More recently, to give the basement area a better flow, Ozbek has created what he calls “a love tunnel” in silk damask paisley patterns, from the dance floor to the lobby. He also opened up the Venetian, Bakst and Ottoman-themed dining rooms “with mirrored gothic Moorish arches – so you can now see the changing colours of every room from one place”. Along with the brief of “timeless”, Ozbek was told there was “no budget, no limits; more is more” by Birley. The result might be the most opulent club in London, even more so than before.

“Working with Rifat is immensely exciting,” says craftsman Rupert Bevan, who worked on the arches and is known for creating some of the most specialist mirrors, furniture and finishings in the UK. “The experience has been dazzling, bewildering and imaginative, unlike anything I’ve worked on before. The new project took the use of mirrors in interiors to a whole different level in terms of surface decoration and lighting. The arches use mirrored glass hand-painted in faux tortoiseshell that’s backlit with LEDs to shine pink. The effect is enchanting and compelling, drawing you into these mysterious little worlds within the club.”

London’s new clubs embrace the exotic as much as they ever did, even if some of them are now on grander scales than the likes of Mark Birley ever attempted. The interior of the Devonshire Club will incorporate elements that are a little bit Charles Rennie Mackintosh, a touch Piet Mondrian. There’ll be plenty of marble, along with midcentury furniture and carpets that look like a monochrome take on the flooring of the hallways in The Shining. The tiling on the floors of the ensuite bathrooms is modernist Mediterranean – graphic with a restrained colour palette. “The rooms are going to be uncluttered,” says Clivaz. “Often you go to a hotel and there’s too much stuff. People want a good shower, a deep bath and a TV that you can watch from a very comfortable bed. In terms of furniture, we might be the most bespoke hotel and club ever.”

Practicality to one side, every club needs a touch of fantasy. As well as producing the Murano glass that Clivaz is looking forward to, Seguso used to create pieces for the arch-postmodernist Memphis group, with its inspiring colour juxtapositions. Meanwhile, interior designer David d’Almada of Sagrada hopes that his designs for the new bedrooms at Mayfair’s The Arts Club (rooms from £600 per night; membership £2,000 per annum, plus £2,000 joining fee) allow the guest “to come back 16 times and have 16 different experiences”. A club is part retreat, part stage. “You can feel like an explorer, wandering around the different areas of Loulou’s,” says Bevan, which was exactly Ozbek’s intention: “My fashion collections had a theme – native American, Ottoman or African – and I was able to adapt that idea for a nightclub,” he explains. “There’s a Tibetan dance floor, a belle-époque entrance hall and a Venetian room. I’ve mixed fabrics, so there are three styles in a chair, just as I used to do with my clothing.” One particularly pretty embellishment at the new-look Loulou’s is a small installation of gold-leaf branches with butterflies, created by model Stella Tennant and her sister Issy.

When d’Almada took on the original task of redesigning The Arts Club (which had strayed a little into Miss Havisham territory) for its reopening in 2011, he restored prosaic aspects of the building that had been hastily fixed up after it was bombed in the Blitz. “It was my way of saying to the members that I had respect for what the club was before,” he says. At the same time, he turned the glamour dial up to 11, bleaching the grand marble staircase and putting a chunky piano-finish handrail on it. It’s Mayfair, but also pure Hollywood.

Somewhere between those two locations lies the secret of the perfect private members’ club. Clivaz says he wants his new space to be “unashamedly glamorous”; Caring wants “to feel part of something where every element and last detail has been carefully considered to enhance and inform the experience”, while for Dubens, it’s a simple, certain frisson: “I remember coming to Mark’s Club at around 23, sitting at the bar drinking a whisky and thinking, ‘Wow – I’m really lucky to be in here.’” Wow factor is everything.

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Designer Rifat Ozbek at Loulou’s, to which he has just finished adding new interiors elements | Image: Neale Haynes/Contour by Getty Images

“There were several ‘non-negotiables’ for the club,” explains Caring, “such as keeping the porter’s box in reception and the iconic William Morris wallpaper that graces the reception and travels all the way up to the top floor.” Birley’s comforting, magpie-like visual sensibilities are still evident: shot-silk pleated walls, paisley carpets and Moroccan side tables. Regulars will be delighted that the red dining room is still clad in red Fortuny fabric, and that the moody, gigantic 1920s oil painting In Time of Peace,by Scottish artist Robert Gemmell Hutchison, of scarlet-coated military men in rows of pews, is still upstairs, adjacent to a grand new humidor.

The Deli-Bar at 12 Hay Hill, which opened in September | Image: Andy Sheppard

“The club had become something of a wilted flower,” says Zervudachi. “We ordered rich coloured silks and weaves for new upholstery and created a recessed coloured-glass light box in the ceiling of the rear dining room.” Dubens called on Zervudachi after the designer had created interiors for his private homes, and he sees the club as an extension of its members’ houses. “Mark Birley’s original idea was that this was going to be a beautiful place for people to enjoy during the week, and then at the weekend they went to their country homes,” says Dubens. “His level of detail was amazing. But there wasn’t a single comfortable chair here before. I flew to Paris with Tino when he was working with the upholsterers and sat in every single chair before it came to the club. Now everything is elegant and comfortable.”

12 Hay Hill’s co-founder and designer Anton Khmelnitskiy

There have been many changes at Mark’s, including the addition of a third-floor private dining room, but the club is not chasing trends. “The club feels fresh, while still being quintessentially ‘Birley’,” says Caring. A cappuccino comes in a Limoges cup and saucer with a magenta floral pattern on it; a Warhol sketch of a pink angel hangs against pink and blue Liberty wallpaper; the bar manager wears a bow tie, and his staff immaculate off-white blazers designed by textile specialists Scabal. From a theatrical Linley backgammon table to the collection of Salon champagnes and the Empire-style bronze chandelier above the bar, Mark’s Club is a modern classic – a place to go for a homemade pizza in the bar upstairs as much as the formal dining it was previously associated with.

The red dining room at the recently reopened Mark’s Club | Image: Simon Brown

A few streets from Mark’s, Rifat Ozbek has just finished adding new elements to the interior of Loulou’s, Robin Birley’s club-within-a-club at 5 Hertford Street (membership price on request). Ozbek – one of the most celebrated fashion designers of the 1980s and who now creates a Turkish-style cushion range under the label Yastık – has been dressing Birley’s wife Lucy for decades, hence the connection. “The original brief was to do something ‘timeless’,” says Ozbek. “After four years, it’s getting better every day.” More recently, to give the basement area a better flow, Ozbek has created what he calls “a love tunnel” in silk damask paisley patterns, from the dance floor to the lobby. He also opened up the Venetian, Bakst and Ottoman-themed dining rooms “with mirrored gothic Moorish arches – so you can now see the changing colours of every room from one place”. Along with the brief of “timeless”, Ozbek was told there was “no budget, no limits; more is more” by Birley. The result might be the most opulent club in London, even more so than before.

“Working with Rifat is immensely exciting,” says craftsman Rupert Bevan, who worked on the arches and is known for creating some of the most specialist mirrors, furniture and finishings in the UK. “The experience has been dazzling, bewildering and imaginative, unlike anything I’ve worked on before. The new project took the use of mirrors in interiors to a whole different level in terms of surface decoration and lighting. The arches use mirrored glass hand-painted in faux tortoiseshell that’s backlit with LEDs to shine pink. The effect is enchanting and compelling, drawing you into these mysterious little worlds within the club.

London’s new clubs embrace the exotic as much as they ever did, even if some of them are now on grander scales than the likes of Mark Birley ever attempted. The interior of the Devonshire Club will incorporate elements that are a little bit Charles Rennie Mackintosh, a touch Piet Mondrian. There’ll be plenty of marble, along with midcentury furniture and carpets that look like a monochrome take on the flooring of the hallways in The Shining. The tiling on the floors of the ensuite bathrooms is modernist Mediterranean – graphic with a restrained colour palette. “The rooms are going to be uncluttered,” says Clivaz. “Often you go to a hotel and there’s too much stuff. People want a good shower, a deep bath and a TV that you can watch from a very comfortable bed. In terms of furniture, we might be the most bespoke hotel and club ever.”

Practicality to one side, every club needs a touch of fantasy. As well as producing the Murano glass that Clivaz is looking forward to, Seguso used to create pieces for the arch-postmodernist Memphis group, with its inspiring colour juxtapositions. Meanwhile, interior designer David d’Almada of Sagrada hopes that his designs for the new bedrooms at Mayfair’s The Arts Club (rooms from £600 per night; membership £2,000 per annum, plus £2,000 joining fee) allow the guest “to come back 16 times and have 16 different experiences”. A club is part retreat, part stage. “You can feel like an explorer, wandering around the different areas of Loulou’s,” says Bevan, which was exactly Ozbek’s intention: “My fashion collections had a theme – native American, Ottoman or African – and I was able to adapt that idea for a nightclub,” he explains. “There’s a Tibetan dance floor, a belle-époque entrance hall and a Venetian room. I’ve mixed fabrics, so there are three styles in a chair, just as I used to do with my clothing.” One particularly pretty embellishment at the new-look Loulou’s is a small installation of gold-leaf branches with butterflies, created by model Stella Tennant and her sister Issy.

When d’Almada took on the original task of redesigning The Arts Club (which had strayed a little into Miss Havisham territory) for its reopening in 2011, he restored prosaic aspects of the building that had been hastily fixed up after it was bombed in the Blitz. “It was my way of saying to the members that I had respect for what the club was before,” he says. At the same time, he turned the glamour dial up to 11, bleaching the grand marble staircase and putting a chunky piano-finish handrail on it. It’s Mayfair, but also pure Hollywood.

Somewhere between those two locations lies the secret of the perfect private members’ club. Clivaz says he wants his new space to be “unashamedly glamorous”; Caring wants “to feel part of something where every element and last detail has been carefully considered to enhance and inform the experience”, while for Dubens, it’s a simple, certain frisson: “I remember coming to Mark’s Club at around 23, sitting at the bar drinking a whisky and thinking, ‘Wow – I’m really lucky to be in here.’” Wow factor is everything.

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